French district – Galerie Lachenaud http://galerie-lachenaud.com/ Thu, 19 May 2022 14:24:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-52.png French district – Galerie Lachenaud http://galerie-lachenaud.com/ 32 32 Coding, personal finance courses highlighted in Michigan bills https://galerie-lachenaud.com/coding-personal-finance-courses-highlighted-in-michigan-bills/ Thu, 19 May 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/coding-personal-finance-courses-highlighted-in-michigan-bills/ Python, HTML, and SQL classes may soon replace Spanish, French, and German in Michigan high school schedules. Students studying computer programming languages ​​or taking other coding courses would earn credit towards their global language degree through a invoice work its way through the state legislature. Separate legislation could also reduce state language requirements. It would […]]]>

Python, HTML, and SQL classes may soon replace Spanish, French, and German in Michigan high school schedules.

Students studying computer programming languages ​​or taking other coding courses would earn credit towards their global language degree through a invoice work its way through the state legislature.

Separate legislation could also reduce state language requirements. It would require high school students to take a half-credit financial literacy course. Credit for this course could be used to fulfill global language, math or art requirements.

Both bills have the support of business groups who say they are interested in a more skilled workforce. But in an example of the ongoing debate over STEM versus humanities in education, they are meeting resistance from critics who fear the bills will reduce local flexibility on the curriculum and further crowding out cultural understanding in favor of a more technical education.

“Personal finance has nothing to do with world language,” said Julie Foss, public liaison for the Michigan World Language Association, which opposes the coding and personal finance bills. “It’s not that we think any of these things don’t have value, but they have no place in replacing the languages ​​of the world.”

She said if Michigan determines that students need to learn computer coding, it makes more sense for the course to meet a math or science requirement.

Michigan students can already decline one of their two required foreign language credits if they take a career and technical education course or earn more than two visual and performing arts credits. It is not known how many students use the CTE or arts courses to meet the global language requirement, but 103,000 students were enrolled in vocational and technical training programs last year.

Students can also complete global language requirements before high school. For example, a district might offer a K-8 language program for all children, which results in fluency equivalent to two years of high school courses.

The Michigan Secondary School Principals Association supports financial literacy but opposes the bill because it does not give districts enough flexibility to decide how to deliver education. For example, districts should have the ability to integrate financial literacy content into existing courses, said MASSP lobbyist Bob Kefgen.

The Michigan Department of Education opposes both bills. Legislative Liaison Sheryl Kennedy said the department supports teaching coding and financial literacy, but opposes any bill that replaces credit from one area of ​​Michigan’s merit program with another.

“A foreign language is not just about learning to speak the language,” she said. “It’s learning about a culture different from ours. Coding doesn’t do that.

Foss, who is also a French teacher, said people often think world language classes have a lot of memorizing vocabulary and grammar rules. But these courses have an “immersive environment” where “culture is at the center,” she said, and students learn communication skills that employers are looking for.

Others say that coding is also a communication skill and that programming languages ​​are as important as spoken languages.

The Grand Rapids Chamber supports both bills and has been working on the computer coding component for years, according to Director of Government Affairs Nate Henschel.

Regarding the personal finance bill, Henschel said “so many young adults are unprepared for the scrutiny of loans, credit cards and other important financial decisions” and that the bill will lead, hopefully to “better financial well-being for years to come.”

In Grand Rapids, Forest Hills High School’s personal finance course is a popular choice. Students say it teaches them how to budget money from their minimum wage jobs, understand pay stubs, open savings accounts and invest in stocks.

“This is one of the only classes in school where I can really see how it will help me in the future,” Clare Hilary Jr. said last week before the Senate Education and Readiness Committee. the career.

Her classmate Jacquelinn Festian told senators that she did not know the difference between a debit card and a credit card until she started the course. Now she knows “it’s very easy to get into debt with your credit card”.

She said every Michigan student should have the chance to learn this and other financial lessons before they graduate.

The two measures could be voted on by the entire Senate in the days or weeks to come. Both have been previously approved by the House. The Senate Education and Career Readiness Committee made small technical changes to the bills, so the House would have to vote again if the Senate approved the amended bills.

Governor Gretchen Whitmer did not say whether she would sign the bills if they reached her office. She will review bills as they move through the legislative process, spokesman Bobby Leddy said Wednesday.

Sixteen years ago, Michigan had only one statewide graduation requirement for high schools: that students take a civics course. Otherwise, districts were free to set their own requirements.

In 2006, the state passed the Michigan Merit Program, which requires a minimum of 18 credits in specified subjects. Local school districts can add to these requirements, and many do.

Ten Michigan districts require personal finance courses, according to NextGen Personal Finance, a nonprofit advocacy group pushing states to require them for all students. Banks and credit unions across the country are also working to draw attention financial literacy needs.

Their efforts succeeded in Florida, Nebraska, Ohioand Rhode Island, which recently passed laws requiring high school students to take personal finance courses. Including Michigan, 18 other states are considering similar laws.

Tracie Mauriello covers state education policy for Chalkbeat Detroit and Bridge Michigan. Join her at tmauriello@chalkbeat.org. Isabel Lohman covers education for Bridge Michigan. Join her at ilohman@bridgemi.com.

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How digitalization is boosting the participation of Arab women in the labor market https://galerie-lachenaud.com/how-digitalization-is-boosting-the-participation-of-arab-women-in-the-labor-market/ Tue, 17 May 2022 09:35:06 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/how-digitalization-is-boosting-the-participation-of-arab-women-in-the-labor-market/ BEIRUT: Hezbollah and its allies in Lebanon are on the verge of losing their parliamentary majority after voters delivered a stunning rejection of the country’s corrupt political elite. Election results showed major victories for non-traditional political forces since polls closed at 7 p.m. Sunday. Vote counting continues after Sunday’s election and full results are not […]]]>

BEIRUT: Hezbollah and its allies in Lebanon are on the verge of losing their parliamentary majority after voters delivered a stunning rejection of the country’s corrupt political elite.

Election results showed major victories for non-traditional political forces since polls closed at 7 p.m. Sunday.

Vote counting continues after Sunday’s election and full results are not expected until Tuesday, but the Iran-backed group admitted on Monday that it was unlikely to win 64 of parliament’s 128 seats. In the last election in 2018, they won 71.

Among the high-profile losers was Hezbollah’s main ally and deputy speaker of parliament, Elie Ferzli, 72, who was ousted by a candidate backed by Druze leader Walid Jumblatt. Talal Arslan, a Druze politician allied with Hezbollah, also lost his seat.

Anti-Hezbollah groups, including the Lebanese Forces and independent reformist candidates, have won important victories. LF said it won 22 seats, up from 15 in 2018. This would see them overtake the Free Patriotic Movement led by controversial former minister Gebran Bassil, which won 16 seats, down from 18 in 2018.

Turnout inside Lebanon topped 40%, down from 45% in the 2018 elections.

Despite recent weeks of sectarian incitement and irregularities and chaos at some polling stations and counting operations, the popular mood has shown a rejection of the traditional forces that govern the country in light of the economic and financial crisis. paralysis that has impoverished more than 80 percent of the population. the people.

Hezbollah and the Amal movement reacted to the close of the elections with premature celebrations in the northern Bekaa region, interspersed with gunfire and even rocket-propelled grenades.

Both parties forced their voters to go to the polls, but were surprised to learn that more than 4,000 spoiled ballots were found inside the ballot boxes, indicating that some voters preferred to distort their ballots instead of vote for the Shia duo.

Other surprises followed, with the candidate of the Lebanese Forces, Antoine Habashi (Maronite), penetrating the list of Hezbollah and the Amal movement and reserving him a seat in the new parliament.

The candidate for the Greek-Orthodox seat, Elias Jaradi, managed to crack the list of the Shiite duo and win the seat won for decades by the representative of the Syrian Social Nationalist Party, Hezbollah ally, Asaad Hardan.

Forces for Change candidate Firas Hamdan was also able to enter the same list and win the Druze seat in place of banker Marwan Khair Al-Din, who was nominated by the Shiite duo on their list.

The absence of the Future Movement from the electoral arena was evident in Sunday’s election results.

The share of votes for the Future Movement was captured by the Shiite parties and the Free Patriotic Movement, the Forces for Change, the deputy Fouad Makhzoumi and other personalities who have a popular presence on the scene.

This split appeared in Beirut, Tripoli and Akkar, despite figures opposed to Hezbollah reaching the parliamentary symposium, according to unconfirmed results.

Ibrahim Mneimneh, 46, an architect, who initially won one of the Sunni seats in Beirut’s second district, told Arab News that “the way the elections in Beirut were conducted confirmed that electoral money does not govern not the people, and that sectarian mobilization and all tools of political fraud have failed resoundingly.

Mneimneh stressed that he had “no intention of voting for the re-election of Speaker of Parliament Nabih Berri as head of parliament again, nor for any of the symbols of authority”.

Doctor Bilal Al-Hashimi won a Sunni seat in Zahlé district on the Lebanese Forces list and Rami Abu Hamdan won the Shia seat in the district.

Al-Bizri, one of the figures calling for change and whose father, MP Nazih Al-Bizri, was known for his integrity in parliament, told Arab News: “We have to work within parliament to find some kind of of alliance to face the alliances of the political system and to initiate a true legislation and a real control on the execution of the political work.

Among other election surprises, Lebanese Democratic Party leader Talal Arslan lost his Druze seat, which he held for nearly 30 years in the Chouf-Aley constituency.

He is a close ally of the Syrian regime and Hezbollah. He lost the seat to Mark Daou, a prominent figure in change groups and a member of the “United for Change” list. Hezbollah’s other ally, Wiam Wahhab, failed to win a Druze siege.

In the constituency of Chouf-Aley, two candidates from the “United for Change” list initially managed to break through to the Free Patriotic Movement list.

These two women had protested against the authority of downtown Beirut and had made themselves known in the media for their opposition to its corruption.

In the Christian community, the electoral battle was fierce between the Free Patriotic Current and the Lebanese Forces Party, with the latter winning 22 seats according to preliminary results, while the number of Free Patriotic Current deputies fell to 16.

Lebanese Forces candidate Ghiath Yazbek (Maronite) won the largest share of votes in the northern third constituency with 9,350 votes, overtaking the region’s MP and leader of the Free Patriotic Movement, Gibran Bassil, who obtained 8,250 voice.

Delegates at the counting center said the ballot box and the 256 ballots were coded, meaning that this ballot box should be voided.

There were demonstrations in front of the center and chants for the revolution, fears that the first results which had brought down the current deputy speaker of the parliament, Elie Ferzli, could be reversed in favor of one of the candidates of the opposition.

Representatives of the electoral machinery spoke of “pressure from very high state authorities on the registration commissions of the Western Bekaa to manipulate the results in order to ensure the victory of Elie Ferzli”.

The Lebanese Association for Democratic Elections confirmed in a report on Monday that there had been “gross violations during the electoral process and the inaction of the Ministry of the Interior in applying the law, as well as attacks against candidates, voters and delegates”.

The United Nations Special Coordinator in Lebanon, Ioana Frontka, took to Twitter to congratulate Lebanon for “organizing the legislative elections on time”. She reminded them that

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Euro 75: Aurora Films (France) | Features https://galerie-lachenaud.com/euro-75-aurora-films-france-features/ Sun, 15 May 2022 17:07:21 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/euro-75-aurora-films-france-features/ Must know: On the occasion of its 20th anniversary, the Parisian company Aurora Films is represented this year in the official selection with the Korean drama by Franco-Cambodian filmmaker Davy Chou All the people I’ll ever be. Aurora founder Charlotte Vincent met Chou in 2014, and soon after they embarked on their first collaboration. Diamond […]]]>

Must know: On the occasion of its 20th anniversary, the Parisian company Aurora Films is represented this year in the official selection with the Korean drama by Franco-Cambodian filmmaker Davy Chou All the people I’ll ever be. Aurora founder Charlotte Vincent met Chou in 2014, and soon after they embarked on their first collaboration. Diamond Island, who played at Cannes Critics’ Week in 2016, winning the SACD prize. Vincent created her company straight out of HEC Paris and focused on working with directors from diverse cultures, which led her to travel and film around the world. Regular collaborators include Franco-Lebanese filmmaker Wissam Charaf (It’s all in Lebanon, heaven sent) and Paris-based Austrian artist Patric Chiha (Boys like us, if it was love). His filmography also features a lot of French cinema with recent credits including Little Solange by Axelle Ropert, who made her debut at the Locarno international competition last year.

Key personnel: Charlotte Vincent, producer; Katia Khazak, producer; Laurane Launois, finance and administration manager.

Incoming: The company has three feature films in post-production: Blandine Lenoir’s Women’s Rights Drama angry Annie; Charaf’s romance in Beirut Dirty, Difficult, Dangerous; and that of Chiha The beast in the jungle, a contemporary adaptation of the short story by Henry James. This year, she is preparing the shooting of the first feature film by the Mongolian director Lkhagvadulam Purev-Ochir Zeabout a young shaman growing up in a yurt district of Ulaanbaatar, the capital of Mongolia.

Charlotte Vincent says: “My imagination and my desire to produce films are rooted in cinema. I look for works that offer something different, narratively and visually, and I think the potential for that is greatest in films made for the big screen.

Contact: contact@aurorafilms.fr

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How the pastrami experts of the Refuge Peninsula were inspired by French gastronomy | News https://galerie-lachenaud.com/how-the-pastrami-experts-of-the-refuge-peninsula-were-inspired-by-french-gastronomy-news/ Fri, 13 May 2022 18:03:11 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/how-the-pastrami-experts-of-the-refuge-peninsula-were-inspired-by-french-gastronomy-news/ To support our local culinary scene, Peninsula Restaurant Week is back for its second year, May 13-21, with special dishes from favorite local restaurants. For the final story in our Q&A series with participating restaurants, we caught up with The Refuge, which has locations in Menlo Park, San Carlos, and San Mateo. The Refuge aims […]]]>

To support our local culinary scene, Peninsula Restaurant Week is back for its second year, May 13-21, with special dishes from favorite local restaurants. For the final story in our Q&A series with participating restaurants, we caught up with The Refuge, which has locations in Menlo Park, San Carlos, and San Mateo.

The Refuge aims to serve the best of Belgium, New York and Philadelphia with its extensive beer list, hand-sliced ​​pastrami sandwiches and gooey cheese steaks. Led by the husband and wife team of Matt Levin and Melanie Roth with Executive Chef Michael Greuel, The Refuge reflects Levin’s passion for pastrami. The menu is unexpectedly inspired by the starred cuisines of Paris as well as New York. The first Refuge site opened in San Carlos in 2008, followed by Menlo Park in 2013 and Hillsdale Mall in 2021.

Wondering how French haute cuisine influenced The Refuge and how they make pastrami they’re ready to take on titans like Katz and Langer? We spoke with Levin to find out more.

This conversation has been edited for clarity and conciseness.

Peninsula Foodist: It was a bit surprising to see on your website that The Refuge’s roots were strongly tied to French cuisine and your dining experiences in France. Could you tell me a bit more about that?

Matt Levin: It’s a good question. It doesn’t seem to make sense. I grew up Jewish, I’m still observant. But at the time, especially in the 90s, I was a Francophile. I had been to France before and was just transfixed. I couldn’t believe people cooked like that.

Also, I went to New Orleans and ate at K-Paulis back when Paul Prudhomme was still alive. (Like The Refuge) it was a first come, first served type of place. I really fell for New Orleans style cooking. I bought “Louisiana Cookery” by Paul Prudhomme and did everything. It’s a perfect cookbook. I learned a lot about French cuisine through this lens.

My wife worked for a French company, and she was transferred to France. I worked in Michelin starred restaurants and learned French. The problem with these kitchens is that they are very militaristic, they are tough. You can not be wrong. The chives should be about half a millimeter. And then if we arrive on the edge of the plate, we have to tackle again.

It’s about people, and it’s about me. And I didn’t eat that type of food. I ate duck confit, a lot of charcuterie, but I’ve never tasted anything as good as very good pastrami. And I’m like, “Why don’t they have that? It’s very similar. It’s a deli.”

When I came back to the States, I thought there was a place there for the casual connoisseur. This is how The Refuge was born. There is actually (a restaurant named) Le Refuge in France. It was such a cool name, as a restaurant (becomes a hideaway) over the years.

Peninsula Foodist: Could you tell us a bit more about the process of making pastrami?

Matt Levin: The process begins with the cutting of meat. We use the beef plate, which comes from beef brisket. We use the heart of the navel. There’s this little corner that’s perfectly marbled. It’s very hard to get right now. It is used a lot for the hot pot.

It’s all in the brine. What sets ours apart is the freshness of the spices. For garlic, you can use different types of sugars: brown, cane, beet to add different dimensions, not just sweetness.

After three to five days, it is rubbed with coriander and black pepper, it is traditional. We collect all the drips, we make what Guy Fieri (who featured The Refuge in “Diners, Drive-Ins & Dives”) called a lacquer and after we cut, we dip the meat back into it. We put very little smoke on it. that, you don’t want to be like Texas barbecue. The rest of the game is steamed until tender.

Peninsula Foodist: People have strong opinions about their regional dishes like pastrami and cheesesteaks. Have you ever felt any kind of pressure doing them?

Matt Levin: Yeah, I would never have put pastrami on the menu if I didn’t think it could compete with the big boys.

I love when people can have a lively discussion about food. People should be passionate about their regional foods since many of them don’t travel to the west coast. I’m protecting the East Coast here, it’s safe in (The Refuge). I try to do things as authentically as possible.

Peninsula Foodist: Anything else you would like diners coming for Restaurant Week to know?

Matt Levin: I made the pastrami combo (half a pastrami sandwich, fries and a beer) our special because I don’t think the pastrami market is saturated yet. There are still people who come who have never eaten pastrami. I want guests to be open to a glimpse of what the Refuge has to offer.

You really have to travel to get the products we serve. It is the eclectic restaurant par excellence even if we use a classic technique. You have the opportunity to try all these things in their authentic state in one place: Belgian beers, pastrami, homemade burgers and cheesesteaks. The meat we use for pastrami is not cheaper, but it is worth keeping.

The shelter, 1143 Crane St., Menlo Park; 650-319-8197, refugesc.com. Instagram: @refuge_menlopark. Additional locations in San Carlos and San Mateo.

Enter to win up to $850 in gift cards to local restaurants! To visit peninsularestaurantweek.com/about for more details.

Dive into food news. Follow the Peninsula Foodist on Instagram @peninsulafoodist and Subscribe to the newsletter for insight into the latest openings and closings, find out what the Foodist is excited to eat, read exclusive interviews and follow trends affecting local restaurants.

This story originally appeared on TheSixFifty.com, a sister publication to Palo Alto Online, covering what to eat, see, and do in Silicon Valley.

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Birmingham’s Reggie White Named 2022 Alabama Teacher of the Year https://galerie-lachenaud.com/birminghams-reggie-white-named-2022-alabama-teacher-of-the-year/ Thu, 12 May 2022 00:52:00 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/birminghams-reggie-white-named-2022-alabama-teacher-of-the-year/ Do you want more information on national education? Join the Alabama Education Lab for free each week newsletter, Ed Chat. Birmingham elementary school teacher Reggie White was named Alabama’s 2022-23 Teacher of the Year Wednesday night at Montgomery. “I believe it’s important that my students see me as a real person,” White said. “I make […]]]>

Do you want more information on national education? Join the Alabama Education Lab for free each week newsletter, Ed Chat.

Birmingham elementary school teacher Reggie White was named Alabama’s 2022-23 Teacher of the Year Wednesday night at Montgomery.

“I believe it’s important that my students see me as a real person,” White said. “I make sure my students are connected to the world around them. »

White, a National Board-certified fifth-grade teacher, teaches at Booker T. Washington K-8 School. He grew up in Choctaw County and attended Alabama State University, studying communications.

After joining the Baptist Student Union in college, White spent a summer in San Jose, California, where he helped students learn English and mentored their families on ways to help their children understand reading. It was then that he knew he wanted to become an educator.

After returning home from the mission trip, White said he saw an advertisement to recruit new teachers. At the end of the commercial, a student said, “We need you! »

White said he saw himself in the ad and was committed to creating a classroom where all students would feel valued and inspired to achieve their dreams.

Learn more about Alabama Education Lab here.

William Edmonds of the Barton Academy for Advanced World Studies in Mobile County was named substitute teacher of the year. Edmonds received National Board certification in 2009 and currently teaches French to students in grades six through nine at Barton Academy. He was a teacher in Mobile County for 24 years.

“I try to bring every student into a community of care and concern,” Edmonds said. “I ensure they are connected to the world around them by designing and delivering instruction that sparks students’ natural curiosity about the world they live in, while providing them with a broader global perspective.

Alabama’s Teacher of the Year serves as a full-time ambassador for education and the teaching profession and hosts workshops. Alabama’s Teacher of the Year becomes a nominee for National Teacher of the Year. The state’s 2021 Teacher of the Year was Kimberly Johnson of Auburn City Schools.

White and Edmonds were chosen from a group of four finalists, including:

  • Geri Evans Hoover City School System – Bluff Park Elementary School District III Elementary Teacher of the Year
  • Kristen F. Steele Madison City Schools – James Clemens High School District VIII High School Teacher of the Year
  • Kelly S. Parker Mobile County School System – Tanner Williams Elementary School District I Elementary School Teacher of the Year
  • Beverly S. Sport Crenshaw County School System – Luverne School District I Secondary Teacher of the Year
  • Meagan King Johnson Ozark City School System – Lisenby Primary School District II Elementary Teacher of the Year
  • Laura Traylor Ozark City School System – Carroll High School Career Center District II Secondary Teacher of the Year
  • R. Paul McEwan Hoover City School System – Hoover High School District III Secondary Teacher of the Year
  • Monquelle D. Shamburger Birmingham City Schools – AH Parker High School District IV Secondary Teacher of the Year
  • Denisha B. Streeter Selma City Schools – Saints Virtual Academy District V Elementary Teacher of the Year
  • April M. Dean Cullman City Schools – East Elementary School District VI Elementary Teacher of the Year
  • Michele Downey Piedmont City Schools – Piedmont High School District VI Secondary Teacher of the Year
  • Shayna F. Swann Trussville City Schools – Paine Elementary School District VII Elementary Teacher of the Year
  • Andrew Franck Sheffield City Schools – Sheffield Junior High School District VII Secondary Teacher of the Year
  • Doetiletia F. Sims Huntsville City Schools – Highlands Elementary School District VIII Elementary Teacher of the Year
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Inauguration of the longest glass-bottom bridge in the world in Vietnam https://galerie-lachenaud.com/inauguration-of-the-longest-glass-bottom-bridge-in-the-world-in-vietnam/ Sun, 08 May 2022 15:45:00 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/inauguration-of-the-longest-glass-bottom-bridge-in-the-world-in-vietnam/ A huge glass bridge claiming to be the longest in the world has opened 0- but that’s only for the brave. Vietnam’s Bach Long Pedestrian Bridge – whose name translates to “white dragon” – is 632m (2,073ft) long – and 150m (492ft) above a huge jungle. The bridge floor is made of French-made tempered glass, […]]]>

A huge glass bridge claiming to be the longest in the world has opened 0- but that’s only for the brave.

Vietnam’s Bach Long Pedestrian Bridge – whose name translates to “white dragon” – is 632m (2,073ft) long – and 150m (492ft) above a huge jungle.

The bridge floor is made of French-made tempered glass, which makes it strong enough to support up to 450 people at a time.

The glass floor also allows tourists to have an unobstructed view of the landscape while braving the spooky walk.

“By standing on the bridge, travelers will be able to admire the beauty of nature,” said Hoang Manh Duy, a representative of the bridge operator.

Bach Long is the third glass bridge in Vietnam. Local Bui Van Thach said he hoped it would encourage more tourists to visit the area.

Guinness World Records officials are expected to verify this claim next month.

The company claims it is the longest glass-bottom bridge in the world, surpassing the 526m (1,726ft) structure in Guangdong, China.

Vietnam launched a new tourist attraction on April 29 with the opening of a glass-bottom bridge.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images
A couple pose for photos at the Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district in Vietnam's Son La province on April 29, 2022.
A couple pose for photos at the Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district, in Vietnam’s Son La province, April 29, 2022.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images
The new Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district, Son La province, Vietnam, on April 29, 2022.
The new Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district, Son La province, Vietnam, April 29, 2022.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images
A young visitor crawls over the Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district, Son La province, Vietnam, April 29, 2022.
The Bach Long Bridge hopes to encourage tourists to visit the area.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images

Vietnamese tourism chiefs are seeking to attract visitors after two years of COVID-19 shutdowns that have kept virtually all foreign travelers out.

If you fancy trying it, you’ll be pleased to hear that Vietnam is open to Brits.

The country has ended quarantine for international visitors and resumed 15 days of visa-free travel for British holidaymakers.

Visitors pose for photos on the footbridge section of the Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district, Vietnam's Son La province, April 29, 2022.
Guinness World Records have yet to verify the colossal bridge.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images
Visitors stand on the walkway of the Bach Long Glass Bridge
Visitors stand on the walkway section of the Bach Long Glass Bridge.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images
This aerial photo shows the new Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district, Son La province, Vietnam, on April 29, 2022.
The longest glass bridge in the world has just been inaugurated in Vietnam.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images

And the new bridge isn’t even the scariest in the world.

One 100m (328ft) ‘bending’ bridge opened in China last year, with many thinking it was too crazy to exist.

In 2020, a 1,692-foot glass bottom bridge opened in Portugal last year.

Visitors stand on the walkway section of the Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district, Vietnam's Son La province, April 29, 2022.
Visitors stand on the walkway section of the Bach Long Glass Bridge on April 29, 2022.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images
This aerial photo shows the newly built Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district, Vietnam's Son La province, April 29, 2022. -- Vietnam has launched a new attraction for tourists -- with heads held high -- - on April 29 with the opening of a glass-bottomed bridge suspended some 150 meters above a lush, jungle-covered gorge.
The bridge hangs hundreds of meters above the jungle.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images
This photo taken on April 28, 2022 shows visitors walking across the Bach Long glass bridge in Moc Chau district in Vietnam's Son La province.
Tourists can walk over 2,000 feet across the bridge.
NHAC NGUYEN/AFP via Getty Images

The bridge is suspended 575 feet above the ground, with a steep drop into the river and the cliffs below – and is the longest pedestrian suspension bridge in the world.

And in 2018, China opened a £15 billion (about $18.5 billion) bridge spanning 34 miles from Hong Kong to Macau – which is the longest sea crossing ever built.

This story originally appeared on The sun and has been reproduced here with permission.

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Three dead, five injured in 90 bloody minutes in New Orleans | Crime/Police https://galerie-lachenaud.com/three-dead-five-injured-in-90-bloody-minutes-in-new-orleans-crime-police/ Fri, 06 May 2022 22:29:00 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/three-dead-five-injured-in-90-bloody-minutes-in-new-orleans-crime-police/ Three people were killed and five injured in shootings over a 90-minute span Friday afternoon in New Orleans, an explosion of widespread violence on the final weekend of the 2022 Jazz & Heritage Festival. The bloodiest crime, a mass shooting two blocks from the Chef Menteur Freeway east of New Orleans, claimed the lives of […]]]>

Three people were killed and five injured in shootings over a 90-minute span Friday afternoon in New Orleans, an explosion of widespread violence on the final weekend of the 2022 Jazz & Heritage Festival.

The bloodiest crime, a mass shooting two blocks from the Chef Menteur Freeway east of New Orleans, claimed the lives of two people and sent four to hospitals.

Police said they were alerted at 2:14 p.m. to victims in the 4800 block of Alcee Fortier Boulevard. Investigators placed at least 45 evidence markers at the scene and recorded the entire block of Fortier, between Peliter and Saigon Drives.

A 25-year-old man died there and another man of unknown age died in a hospital, police said. Four men made their own way to hospital, where three of them, aged 29, 33 and 57, were listed in stable condition, and the fourth, whose age was not immediately known, would have been in critical condition.






New Orleans police are investigating a mass shooting that killed two people and injured four in the 14400 block of Peltier Drive on Friday, May 6, 2022.




The afternoon homicides began around 12:45 p.m. in the Saint-Roch district. Officers said they found an unconscious woman with gunshot wounds in the 1800 block of Painters Street. She died there.

Around 2 p.m., a man was shot dead in the lower part of the French quarter, on rue de Chartres and rue du Gouverneur Nicholls. Emergency medical services took him to the hospital.

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Filming in the French Quarter

New Orleans police are investigating a shooting in the French Quarter at Chartres and Governor Nicholls streets on Friday, May 6, 2022.




City Councilman Oliver Thomas, whose district includes Alcee Fortier’s killing field, said he visited the neighborhood in the evening to speak with police and residents. The pressing crime problem in New Orleans is not where the shots are fired, he said, but how the shots are fired indiscriminately.

A number of recent shootings across the city may be linked to drug gang connections, he said, and their members don’t care who is caught in the crossfire. At the home of Peliter and Alcee Fortier, he said, police found 25 to 30 casings.

“How can we get these gangs off the streets? said Thomas. “Because they are actively pursuing each other.”

“They’re all walking around with machine guns.”

During the Alcee Fortier killings, police asked anyone with information about the shooting to call Homicide Detective Jameson Diesburg at (504) 658-5300 or Crimestoppers of Greater New Orleans Inc. at (504) 822-1111.

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Soria has a big fundraising lead in the Valley’s only open headquarters – GV Wire https://galerie-lachenaud.com/soria-has-a-big-fundraising-lead-in-the-valleys-only-open-headquarters-gv-wire/ Wed, 04 May 2022 21:11:15 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/soria-has-a-big-fundraising-lead-in-the-valleys-only-open-headquarters-gv-wire/ Fresno Councilwoman Esmeralda Soria established a big financial lead in the open seat of Assembly District 27. In numbers reported to the state last week, Soria, a Democrat, raised more than the three other competitors in the race together. She reports contributions of $378,925. Of the state’s eight legislature seats in June’s primary ballot, only […]]]>

Fresno Councilwoman Esmeralda Soria established a big financial lead in the open seat of Assembly District 27. In numbers reported to the state last week, Soria, a Democrat, raised more than the three other competitors in the race together. She reports contributions of $378,925.

Of the state’s eight legislature seats in June’s primary ballot, only one is wide open — Assembly District 27 representing parts of Fresno, Madera and Merced counties.

“The contributions made across the Central Valley have shown just how eager Assembly District 27 is for change. With this level of support, it is clear that I am in a position to move forward in the primary in June and win outright in November,” Soria said in a press release.

The other seven seats in the local Senate and Assembly follow a political reality – incumbents dominate and fundraising never stops.

Even if a candidate wins more than 50% of the vote on June 7, the top two in each race will qualify for the November general election, regardless of political party.

An open AD 27 seat

Soria has a long list of supporters — from other elected Democratic leaders to endorsements and financial support from labor groups.

She also transferred funds from her account to the city council, which include unusual lines on her ledger. Councilman Garry Bredefeld gave Soria $500 in 2018. That money is now being transferred. Bredefeld and Soria are often in political disagreement on the dais of the city council. Both resorted to insults on several occasions.

Another transfer of note in 2018 – $500 from Rep. Jim Costa, D-Fresno. Soria ran against Costa for Congress in 2020 but failed to advance beyond the primary.

Former Merced County Sheriff Mark Pazin is the second of four candidates in the District 27 race, collecting $110,436. Fresno Councilman Mike Karbassi raised $71,005.

Granville Homes, Inc. paid Karbassi $4,900. Darius Assemi is the CEO of Granville and publisher of GV Wire.

the maximum an individual or company can contribute is $4,900 per election cycle; political action and small committees of contributors can give more.

Left to right: Esmeralda Soria, Mike Karbassi, Mark Pazin and Amanda Fleming show up to represent Assembly District 27. (GV Wire Composite/Paul Marshall)

Three to six digits for SD 16

The most tedious challenge to an incumbent in Senate District 16, where three candidates raised six figures – incumbent Melissa Hurtado, D-Bakersfield, Democrat Nicole Parra of Bakersfield and Republican David Shepard of Porterville.

Hurtado moved to Bakersfield and changed districts to avoid a starting vs. starting showdown against Anna Caballero, D-Merced, in SD 14. The move seemed to pay off financially for both candidates.

Assemblyman Jim Patterson, R-Fresno, is in his last election before stepping down, and he has no challenger. With a war chest of almost half a million dollars, he could be a very popular man among the other Republican candidates in the future.

State Legislature Fundraising

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MCSD Board of Trustees Adds Signing Bonus for More Open Teaching Jobs | News, Sports, Jobs https://galerie-lachenaud.com/mcsd-board-of-trustees-adds-signing-bonus-for-more-open-teaching-jobs-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 03 May 2022 05:22:46 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/mcsd-board-of-trustees-adds-signing-bonus-for-more-open-teaching-jobs-news-sports-jobs/ TR PHOTO BY SUSANNA MEYER Nora Ryan, director of human resources for the Marshalltown Community School District (MCSD), has recommended offering a $5,000 signing bonus for full-time science teaching positions in grades seven through Grade 12 and for an Elementary Extended Learning Program (XLP) teaching position at the regular Monday evening board […]]]>

TR PHOTO BY SUSANNA MEYER Nora Ryan, director of human resources for the Marshalltown Community School District (MCSD), has recommended offering a $5,000 signing bonus for full-time science teaching positions in grades seven through Grade 12 and for an Elementary Extended Learning Program (XLP) teaching position at the regular Monday evening board meeting.

In an effort to address staffing issues within the Marshalltown Community School District (MCSD), the school board approved a $5,000 enrollment bonus for open science teaching positions in grades seven through Grade 12, as well as Extended Learning Program (XLP) instruction. position at the regular Monday evening meeting.

The sign-up bonus is not the first of its kind at MCSD – at a previous board meeting, sign-up bonuses of $5,000 were approved to help fill several other teaching positions in special education, high school French, high school industrial arts and mathematics.

Director of Human Resources Nora Ryan said the district ultimately decided not to hire a French teacher for the fall semester, but that signing bonus is still available for all special education positions. the industrial arts station and the high school math stations.

Ryan recommended extending this bounty to an XLP teaching position at the elementary level, as well as full-time science teaching positions in grades seven through 12, in the hopes that this will encourage more teachers to apply.

“The XLP position, for example, has been posted since December, we’ve had one candidate, and the science positions, I don’t know by heart how many candidates we’ve had, but nothing that’s been a good fit,” Ryan said, “So we’re really hoping that this $5,000 will not only attract people, but you know, maybe even attract them from other districts.”

Ryan also said the bonus could appeal to new teaching graduates who don’t yet know where they want to work.

Board member Zach Wahl asked if the sign-up bonuses currently available for other subjects had helped recruit teachers, and Ryan said there wasn’t exactly a conclusive answer to his question.

“For special education, for example, we recently hired some great people. I’ve seen more hiring referrals come forward, i.e. the process of them saying “I want to hire this person.” The problem is we’re just losing more people than we’re bringing in, but I think it’s been successful,” Ryan said. “I just don’t know if that’s the only thing that brought people here, I don’t know. For industrial arts, obviously not yet, since we haven’t filled that position, but (in) special education, we have filled several.

While Ryan wasn’t sure the signing bonus was the driving factor in new hires, with 45 open positions in the district, she said it “definitely didn’t hurt.” The vacancies are on the statewide hard-to-fill list, which Ryan says is only growing.

Wahl asked what the long-term strategy was outside of providing signing bonuses, and Ryan said they’re doing as much outreach as they can, whether that’s emailing potential candidates or assisting to university degrees.

“We are doing the best we can. As I meet more and more HR directors across the state, we’re all — even the small, tiny districts all the way up to the big districts — we’re all in the same boat, in trouble,” Ryan said.

The bonus was approved by a 6–0 vote, as Leah Stanley was absent. Although the premium is paid upfront, if the person leaves before three years have elapsed, they are required to repay the premium on a pro rata basis.

There were several recognitions at the board meeting, starting with Superintendent Theron Schutte honoring the school board for its service to the community to celebrate School Board Appreciation Month. The board also recognized all MCSD teachers for Teacher Appreciation Week and four students who did well in the National History Day (NHD) state competition.

Marshalltown High School (MHS) students Yessenia Alvarez Zamora and Leticia Herrera qualified for NHD Nationals with their group show “La Huelga: The Struggle That Brought Farmworkers Rights,” and MHS student Charlie Gilbertson won the award of military history and was a finalist for nationals with his documentary “How the U-2 Incident Eroded Super Power Diplomacy”.

Lucas Hagen, a student at Miller Middle School, placed in the top three in the junior individual performance division of the state competition with his performance titled “The Caning of Senator Charles Sumner” and was selected as an alternate for the next national NHD competition.

In other cases counsel:

• Heard an update from Hoglan Elementary School and school board representatives.

• Approved updated student manuals 2022-2023.

• Approved the 2022 Early Graduate List recommendations.

• Approved a request from Chief Technology Officer, Amy Harmsen, to solicit an RFP for new aquatic display and scoring equipment.

——

Contact Susanna Meyer

at 641-753-6611 or

smeyer@timesrepublican.com.



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5 things to know on May 1, 2022: Start your week smart: Ukraine, Covid-19, Ford recall, Tornado, Naomi Judd https://galerie-lachenaud.com/5-things-to-know-on-may-1-2022-start-your-week-smart-ukraine-covid-19-ford-recall-tornado-naomi-judd/ Sun, 01 May 2022 12:41:00 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/5-things-to-know-on-may-1-2022-start-your-week-smart-ukraine-covid-19-ford-recall-tornado-naomi-judd/ A Ukrainian serviceman looks at the booster stage of a fallen Russian ballistic missile in a field in Bohodarove, Ukraine, Monday, April 25. A firefighter uses his mobile phone on top of a truck Wednesday, April 27, as smoke billows from the burning Bhalswa landfill in New Delhi. A man digs a grave at a […]]]>

A Ukrainian serviceman looks at the booster stage of a fallen Russian ballistic missile in a field in Bohodarove, Ukraine, Monday, April 25.

A firefighter uses his mobile phone on top of a truck Wednesday, April 27, as smoke billows from the burning Bhalswa landfill in New Delhi.

A man digs a grave at a cemetery in Irpin, Ukraine, on the outskirts of kyiv, Wednesday, April 27.

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II is seen at Windsor Castle during her meeting with Swiss President Ignazio Cassis on Thursday April 28.

Performers from the Beija Flor samba school take part in Carnival celebrations in Rio de Janeiro on Saturday, April 23.

A worker restores a power line next to a pair of nesting storks in Borodianka, Ukraine, Thursday, April 21.

Chicago Cubs center fielder Michael Hermosillo catches a fly ball during a Major League Baseball game in Atlanta on Tuesday, April 26.

Russian President Vladimir Putin walks past a guard in Moscow during a Kremlin ceremony honoring the country’s Olympians and Paralympians on Tuesday, April 26.

A rare violin made in 1736 by Giuseppe Guarneri is displayed at an auction house in Neuilly-sur-Seine, France, on Tuesday April 26.

Ukrainians displaced by the Russian invasion observe Easter Sunday at a shelter in Lviv, Ukraine on April 24.

Supporters of Irish football club Shamrock Rovers launch flares ahead of a game in Dublin on Friday April 22.

Servicemen in St. Petersburg, Russia, take part in a rehearsal Thursday, April 28 for an upcoming Victory Day parade marking the triumph of World War II over Nazi Germany.

The village of Demydiv, Ukraine, is flooded on Monday April 25. Ukraine intentionally released water from a hydroelectric dam to block Russia’s military advance.

Diego Schwartzman serves during a match at the Barcelona Open on Sunday, April 24.

Women and girls dressed as ancient Romans parade through Rome during celebrations for the birth of Rome on Sunday, April 24.

Professional bodybuilders battle it out in the open heavyweight division at a competition in Melbourne on Saturday, April 23.

A man cries as he carries the body of a young girl during a funeral procession in Tripoli, Lebanon, Monday, April 25. She was among seven people killed when a small boat full of migrants sank over the weekend.

People walk past “Spectra,” a seven-story art installation by Newsubstance, during the Coachella festival in Indio, Calif., on Saturday, April 23.

A group of cyclists pass the Château de Champvent in Switzerland during the first stage of the Tour de Romandie on Wednesday April 27.

Swedish House Mafia performs at the Coachella Festival in Indio, CA on Sunday, April 24.

Professional golfer Nasa Hataoka is doused in water after winning the Los Angeles Open on Sunday April 24.

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