Map guide – Galerie Lachenaud http://galerie-lachenaud.com/ Thu, 12 May 2022 18:22:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-52.png Map guide – Galerie Lachenaud http://galerie-lachenaud.com/ 32 32 Georgia takes on Duke in NCAA Round of 16 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/georgia-takes-on-duke-in-ncaa-round-of-16/ Thu, 12 May 2022 17:04:45 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/georgia-takes-on-duke-in-ncaa-round-of-16/ History links NCAA TOURNAMENT ROUND OF 16#13 GEORGIA vs #4 DUKEDate: May 12, 2022 Weather: 5 p.m. Location: Durham, North Carolina Site: Ambler Tennis Stadium MEDIA INFORMATIONMedia Guide: https://gado.gs/8b6 Season statistics: https://gado.gs/7mv Live statistics: https://gado.gs/9b9 Live video: Tennis One App social mediaKeep up to date with all the latest Bulldogs […]]]>

NCAA TOURNAMENT ROUND OF 16
#13 GEORGIA vs #4 DUKE

Date:
May 12, 2022

Weather: 5 p.m.

Location: Durham, North Carolina

Site: Ambler Tennis Stadium

MEDIA INFORMATION
Media Guide:
https://gado.gs/8b6

Season statistics: https://gado.gs/7mv

Live statistics: https://gado.gs/9b9

Live video: Tennis One App

social media
Keep up to date with all the latest Bulldogs news and information by following UGA Women’s Tennis on Twitter @UGAWomensTennis, on Instagram @UGAWomensTennis and on Facebook @GeorgiaWomensTennis
or view information online at georgiadogs.com.

TICKET AND PARKING INFORMATION
Tickets to the NCAA Division I Women’s Tennis Championships are $5 for those over 19 and $3 for ages 3-18. Tickets are available for purchase HERE. Game parking is available in the Blue Zone and Card ADA lot. To see the map, click HERE (PDF).


QUICK KEYS

792 wins, 19 SEC titles, 6 national championships

Georgia head coach Jeff Wallace is now in his 37th year at the helm of the Bulldogs tennis program. As the nation’s winningest active women’s tennis coach, Wallace is one of only two coaches to record 750 wins in women’s tennis history. Wallace entered the 2022 dual season with 773 career wins.

Wallace’s words
“The team is really excited,” Georgia head coach said Jeff Wallace mentioned. “We move on to the round of 16 to face the No. 3 seed, Duke. They’ve had a great year, obviously a great team and a great program. We’re really looking forward to this opportunity. I think our team is reaching its pinnacle at the right time, everything we’ve done here at our regional… We’re just excited for this next opportunity.

NCAA Tournament History
The Georgia women received an NCAA Tournament bid for the 35th straight year with an all-time tournament record of 89-32. The 2022 season marks the 11th consecutive year the Bulldog women have secured a host position for the first and second rounds of the tournament. Georgian women have two NCAA titles (1994 and 2000), while a Bulldog has won the NCAA singles championship three times (1984 Lisa Spain, 1994 Angela Lettiere and 2010 Chelsey Gullickson).

Dawgs in the leaderboard
No. 13 Georgia has four rankings: A quartet of individuals, No. 17 Mell ReascoNo. 28 Lea Maand no. 99 Dasha Vidmanova; a doubles teams in No. 20 Morgan Coppoc and Ania Hertel.

In the fall, the ITA also ranks the Top 10 Freshman/Newcomer, Reasco came in at No. 4.

Blue Devil Scouting
The No. 4 Duke is coming off a 4-0 victory over Quinnipiac and a 4-1 win over Old Dominion. The Blue Devils are 21-3 this season. Duke owns six rankings: a trio of individuals in No. 9 Chloe Beck, No. 14 Georgia Drummi and No. 106 Kelly Chen; three doubles teams in No. 17 Georgia Drummi and Karolina Berankova, No. 49 Chloe Beck and Elizabeth Coleman, and No. 68 Kelly Chen and Eliza Omirou.

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Authorities in northern Arkansas investigate guide services after death while hiking near Buffalo National River https://galerie-lachenaud.com/authorities-in-northern-arkansas-investigate-guide-services-after-death-while-hiking-near-buffalo-national-river/ Tue, 10 May 2022 21:58:00 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/authorities-in-northern-arkansas-investigate-guide-services-after-death-while-hiking-near-buffalo-national-river/ COMPTON, Ark. (KY3) – Authorities in northern Arkansas, including the Newton County Sheriff’s Office, are investigating illegal guiding services along the Buffalo National River (BNR) after the death of a Springfield hiker , Missouri, from the aftermath of a fall into the Indian Creek drainage of the Buffalo National River. Brad Thomas, 46, died Saturday […]]]>

COMPTON, Ark. (KY3) – Authorities in northern Arkansas, including the Newton County Sheriff’s Office, are investigating illegal guiding services along the Buffalo National River (BNR) after the death of a Springfield hiker , Missouri, from the aftermath of a fall into the Indian Creek drainage of the Buffalo National River.

Brad Thomas, 46, died Saturday afternoon after falling near Needle’s Eye in the Ponca Wilderness Area. Death has shaken regular hikers in the area.

“It’s really sad to hear that someone came here to enjoy nature and see what Arkansas has to offer, and lost their life,” said Landon Ballard, a frequent hiker. of the region. “Just getting to know the area is so important – something I love to do. I have my map here. I like to study that before I go on the Trail and also take it with me.

Information released by the Newton County Sheriff shows an investigation into the guide service escorting Thomas, who did not have the proper license or insurance.

“Just do your due diligence to make sure they are who they say they are,” Sheriff Glenn Wheeler said. “Research the area before you come as we love people coming to visit the area, but this is serious business.”

This permit is called the Commercial Use Authorization (CUA). According to the National Park Service website, a CUA is required if you provide goods, assets, services, agreements, or other functions to park visitors.

“When you’re in the park, you need a little extra help. You might want to rent a canoe or kayak or go with a crew,” said Cassie Brandstetter, public information officer at the BNR “Information on all of our tests, preparations or companies authorized to provide these services can be found on our website or by calling us.”

Some frequent hikers say they use services like All Trais or Trail Link to familiarize themselves before heading out.

“Usually I try to find out how difficult it is, how far, how tiring it is; so I can decide if I’m fit or not,” said Robert Felischmann, who spent several years hiking in the Bavarian Alps in Germany. “Twenty years ago, the difficulty of a hiking trail wouldn’t have been my concern, but it becomes more important with age, and you can never be too prepared.”

BNR Rangers have responded to several hiking accidents in the Indian Creek watershed over the past month. It is described as an undeveloped backcountry area comprising extremely technical, loose and slippery terrain and steep terrain.

Click here to learn more about testing in Northern Arkansas.

To report a correction or typo, please email digitalnews@ky3.com

Copyright 2022 KY3. All rights reserved.

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How to Make Campus Tours Inviting (Review) https://galerie-lachenaud.com/how-to-make-campus-tours-inviting-review/ Mon, 09 May 2022 07:13:58 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/how-to-make-campus-tours-inviting-review/ Of all the experiences I’ve had in three decades of working in the admissions counseling profession, visiting colleges is my favorite. I was in peak visiting mode during my nine years as a college counselor, and I’ve continued to find every excuse I can find to walk around campus since I left high school. Turns […]]]>

Of all the experiences I’ve had in three decades of working in the admissions counseling profession, visiting colleges is my favorite. I was in peak visiting mode during my nine years as a college counselor, and I’ve continued to find every excuse I can find to walk around campus since I left high school.

Turns out, parenthood is the best excuse of all.

My wife and I recently spent a week visiting colleges with our youngest son, a high school student. I must admit from the outset that I am fully aware of the privilege that allows us to make such a trip. It’s the shocking reality that hits when you work for an organization whose mission is centered on equity and access. It’s also why the innovative ways colleges have found to connect with students virtually over the past two years must continue even as in-person visits resume.

This ability to make connections, whether in person or remotely, is essential. He sets the tone, he keeps the interest going and he closes the deal. Here are some of the ways the colleges we visited and the tour guides we met tried to connect and how their approaches worked or, in some cases, didn’t work.

Useful hints. The visiting experience begins even before a family sets foot on campus. The confirmation emails my son received were mixed. All did a great job of advising when we should arrive and where we should go. But finding a parking space and then driving from the parking lot to the visitor center? This is where things got dicey.

The best arrival experience came from a college that emailed precise instructions, complete with photos, on where to enter the garage, then put up directional signs at each exit. We followed these signs like breadcrumbs to the check-in counter.

At the other end of the spectrum was the college which directed us to a large and confusing expanse of faculty, staff, students and visitor parking, which depending on where we found may or may not being close to where we needed to go. The greeting for visitors might as well have been “Welcome and good luck!” »

A sense of belonging. All of the colleges we visited were larger, both in terms of student population and campus area. Personally, I find that any unfamiliar space tends to seem bigger than it is until I understand how things fit together. That’s why my family and I found the two-college approach particularly appealing.

On the first, the tour started at a visitor center which upon arrival made us feel like we were in the backcountry of campus. The fact that we had to take a bus to get to the starting point of the walking tour only reinforced this impression. The visit was preceded by an information session which ended very intelligently with a huge map of the campus. “Before you go,” said the admissions officer, “we want to show you where you’re going.” On the map appeared a small animated bus icon, and he used it to map out our tour route, explaining what we would see and pass along the way. The strategy was ingenious and instantly made a very large campus feel quite manageable.

On the other campus, our first tour stop was on a grassy expanse leading down to the library. Our guide explained that the campus is organized as a series of concentric rings: a library in the middle, academic buildings around them, residential and student services buildings around them, and sports facilities flanking them all. We couldn’t immediately see everything from our perch, but as we walked around campus, we almost instinctively knew how all the spaces related to each other.

Personal talks. Forget the culture wars – the most polarizing issue on a college campus is whether tour guides should back off. There is no middle ground. Period.

I don’t particularly care which direction my guide is facing as long as I can hear what he is saying, but here is something we had never experienced before. On two of our tours, our forward-facing guides started by explicitly stating that they would not back up as it limits who they can talk to. Instead, they planned to use the time between tour stops to converse one-on-one with as many potential students as possible. And they did, meeting a different student after each stop, introducing themselves and asking about their interests and questions. It was a simple gesture that proved surprisingly personal and effective in a large group.

Tale. Years ago, when I was an admissions officer, I had a standard shtick in my presentation repertoire. I would say, “If you’ve ever visited colleges, you’ve probably learned two things. The first is that we all love to tell you how unique we are. The second is that we are all unique in the same way.

The line wasn’t particularly funny, as the polite, weary laughter of the parents reminded me each time. But it was true. Nearly three decades later, that’s still the case: colleges can struggle to distinguish themselves from each other.

Students are a powerful antidote to this homogeneity. Their stories are rich, their personalities vibrant and their experiences diverse. When guides reflect on these stories, campuses come alive.

A guide shared that he failed his first calculus exam and used that as motivation to take advantage of his teacher’s office hours. He got an A in the class. A sports guide has recruited friends to be the unofficial cheerleaders for their dorm’s intramural contests, uniforms and all, so they can be part of the fun and community-building experience. A third guide explained how he felt left out after missing the entire freshman orientation due to a family marriage until a random guy in the hallway walked into his room, fell on a chair and starts talking. This random guy is now one of her best friends.

The goal of any campus visit experience, whether in-person or virtual, is to help prospective students answer a single question: “Can I see myself here?” The key to answering this question will lie in how connected they feel. Colleges can lay the groundwork with clear pre-visit communications, a welcoming arrival experience, and a visitation program that invites personal stories and one-on-one interactions. During our visits, when our son felt connected as a visitor, he easily believed that he would feel connected as a student.

His parents too.

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To refine water forecasts, Western cities map snow by plane | Jackson Hole Daily https://galerie-lachenaud.com/to-refine-water-forecasts-western-cities-map-snow-by-plane-jackson-hole-daily/ Sat, 07 May 2022 06:00:00 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/to-refine-water-forecasts-western-cities-map-snow-by-plane-jackson-hole-daily/ Country united states of americaUS Virgin IslandsU.S. Minor Outlying IslandsCanadaMexico, United Mexican StatesBahamas, Commonwealth ofCuba, Republic ofDominican RepublicHaiti, Republic ofJamaicaAfghanistanAlbania, People’s Socialist Republic ofAlgeria, People’s Democratic Republic ofAmerican SamoaAndorra, Principality ofAngola, Republic ofAnguillaAntarctica (the territory south of 60 degrees S)Antigua and BarbudaArgentina, Argentine RepublicArmeniaArubaAustralia, Commonwealth ofAustria, Republic ofAzerbaijan, Republic ofBahrain, Kingdom ofBangladesh, People’s Republic ofBarbadosBelarusBelgium, […]]]>

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DC’s 2022 Michelin Star Restaurants and Bib Gourmands https://galerie-lachenaud.com/dcs-2022-michelin-star-restaurants-and-bib-gourmands/ Thu, 05 May 2022 17:29:01 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/dcs-2022-michelin-star-restaurants-and-bib-gourmands/ Oyster Oyster, a new Michelin star restaurant. Photograph by Rey Lopez The 2022 Michelin Guide to DC Restaurants is out and bigger than ever. This year’s “little red book” has 24 starred restaurants, with four new one-star à la carte destinations: Albi wood-fired Mediterranean restaurant at Navy Yard; Tasting-counter-in-a-West End Imperfecto restaurant: the Chef’s Table; […]]]>

Oyster Oyster, a new Michelin star restaurant. Photograph by Rey Lopez

The 2022 Michelin Guide to DC Restaurants is out and bigger than ever. This year’s “little red book” has 24 starred restaurants, with four new one-star à la carte destinations: Albi wood-fired Mediterranean restaurant at Navy Yard; Tasting-counter-in-a-West End Imperfecto restaurant: the Chef’s Table; Factory-centric fixed-price Oyster in Shaw; and Johnny Spero’s contemporary tasting room in Georgetown, Reverie.

The wallet-friendly Bib Gourmand prices are even more varied, with a total of 36 restaurants where diners can get a full meal for around $40 per person. New arrivals range from Indian street food at Daru off H Street in the northeast, to destination-worthy ramen at Petworth’s Menya Hosaki.

As has been the case since Michelin’s launch here, the guide only covers restaurants in the district proper, with the exception of the three-star Inn at Little Washington in Rappahannock County, Virginia.

food editor

Anna Spiegel covers the restaurant and bar scene in her native DC. Before joining Washingtonian in 2010, she completed the MFA program at the French Culinary Institute and Columbia University in New York, and held various cooking and writing positions in New York and St. John, in the US Virgin Islands.

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8 Hot Houston Restaurants Have Last-Minute Options for Mother’s Day https://galerie-lachenaud.com/8-hot-houston-restaurants-have-last-minute-options-for-mothers-day/ Tue, 03 May 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/8-hot-houston-restaurants-have-last-minute-options-for-mothers-day/ As surprising as it may seem that only three weeks separate Easter and Mother’s Day, the time to celebrate the mother figures in our lives has arrived. Sure, many of Houston’s most popular restaurants are fully booked, but a few places have tables for people willing to compromise by dining earlier or later. This roundup […]]]>

As surprising as it may seem that only three weeks separate Easter and Mother’s Day, the time to celebrate the mother figures in our lives has arrived. Sure, many of Houston’s most popular restaurants are fully booked, but a few places have tables for people willing to compromise by dining earlier or later.

This roundup includes Houston’s culinary must-haves, as well as a few newcomers and more casual options open to walk-ins.

Park Brewery
The French restaurant near Discovery Green will serve a $60 three-course brunch menu from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. as well as a $70 dinner menu per person. Specials include a photo booth from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m., live music, and specialty cocktails. Choice of crab cake, lobster salad, salmon toast, beef bourguignon and dessert of your choice.

But
The Energy Corridor’s new Mexican restaurant will celebrate Mother’s Day with brunch from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Choices include Huevos Rancheros, Huevos Divorciados (red and green sauce, eggs, crispy potatoes, beans, and chicharron), Molletes de Chorizo ​​(bolillo bread, eggs, beans, Oaxaca cheese, avocado, pico de gallo, and pickled onion ) steak and eggs, and more.

Peaks
The Mexican restaurant will complement its usual brunch buffet with a chef’s carving station topped with prime rib and leg of lamb, as well as a raw sea bass featuring oysters, shrimp and ceviche. Other options include both an omelet station and a waffle station. Build-it-yourself bellinis and mimosas – La Bella prosecco paired with different fruits – will also be available. The brunch buffet is $54 for adults, $42 for seniors, $30 for children over eight, and free for children under eight. Reservations can be made here.

Roka Akor
In lieu of brunch, consider the $110-pp three-course dinner menu at this River Oaks-area Japanese steakhouse. Choices include shrimp and lobster dumplings; Seared Salmon Nigiri Flambé; Robata grilled sea bass with sautéed mushrooms; Prime New York Strip with Miso Compound Butter; and chocolate cake with vanilla ice cream.

III by Wolfgang Puck
The celebrity chef has returned to Houston with this new establishment at Texas Medical Center. Served from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., the brunch buffet ($65 for adults, $20 for kids 6-12) includes traditional brunch dishes like buttermilk pancakes, smoked salmon and a quiche with side dishes. made-to-order eggs, waffle bar, raw bar, and more.

Treebeards
The memorial area location of the popular Cajun/Creole restaurant will feature its BBQ shrimp and grits for Mother’s Day. In addition, all moms who dine will receive a free mimosa. A host of take-out options, including whole cakes, are also available.

The union kitchen
The welcoming neighborhood restaurant’s six locations will offer special Mother’s Day brunches and dinners. Choices include lobster mousse deviled eggs, shrimp and grits, lobster tempura and waffles, and more. For dinner, consider Seafood Stuffed Plaice or Filet Oscar.

wild oats
There are a few tables left at Chris Shepherd’s new restaurant at the Houston Farmers Market. Sunday brunch buffet selections vary from week to week, but diners can count on a mix of vegetable, seafood, and roast meat dishes. Best of all, kids eat free on Mother’s Day.

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Australia Climate Risk Map https://galerie-lachenaud.com/australia-climate-risk-map/ Mon, 02 May 2022 04:02:40 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/australia-climate-risk-map/ The Climate Council Australia Climate Risk Map is an interactive map of climate-vulnerable places in Australia. Enter your suburb or postcode in the search bar in the upper right corner of the map below to understand the risks in your area. How to use the climate risk map [click here to expand] This map allows […]]]>

The Climate Council Australia Climate Risk Map is an interactive map of climate-vulnerable places in Australia. Enter your suburb or postcode in the search bar in the upper right corner of the map below to understand the risks in your area.

How to use the climate risk map [click here to expand]

This map allows you to visualize the percentage of properties in your suburb, local government area, or federal electorate that are at medium to high risk* of climate impacts. To start:

  1. Enter your suburb or postal code in the search bar in the upper right corner of the map.
  2. Click on your suburb, or surrounding suburbs, to see how they will be affected by climate change and the number of at-risk properties in your area.
  3. Scroll down and switch between low, medium, and high emissions scenarios, as well as different time frames, geographies, and hazards to understand how climate action, or lack thereof, will impact the number of homes in your community at risk of climatic impacts.

Climate change impact analysis is provided by Climate Valuation. Visit www.climatevaluation.com for more information.

FAQ – Answers to your questions

*What is a medium or high risk house?

High risk houses have annual damage costs from climate change and extreme weather equivalent to 1% or more of the replacement cost of the property. These properties are effectively uninsurable, because – although policies may still be offered by some insurance companies – insurance premiums are expected to become too expensive for people, making insurance inaccessible.

Medium risk properties have annual damage costs equivalent to 0.2-1% of the replacement cost of the property. These properties are at risk of being underinsured.

What do the different emission scenarios mean?

The map allows you to explore extreme weather impacts under three different emission scenarios. These scenarios are based on the “Representative Concentration Pathways” or “RCPs” used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. The low, medium and high scenarios correspond respectively to RCPs 2.6, 4.5 and 8.5.

Low: This scenario shows extreme weather impacts in a scenario where global emissions are significantly reduced. This scenario would likely limit global average temperature rise to about 1.8ºC in 2100. (Available data did not allow us to model a scenario that would see global average temperature rise limited to 1.5ºC.)

Medium: This scenario shows extreme weather impacts in a scenario in which all countries implement their existing emission reduction policies, resulting in a likely increase in global average temperature of about 2.7ºC by 2100.

High: This scenario shows extreme weather impacts in a high emissions scenario, in which the world flatly fails to address the climate crisis. This corresponds to a likely temperature range of about 4.4°C by 2100.

How are the different hazards defined?

The map covers five hazards exacerbated by climate change: riverine flooding, surface water flooding, coastal flooding, bush fires and extreme winds. Definitions of each of these hazards are provided below:

  • River floods it is when a river exceeds its capacity, flooding nearby areas.
  • Coastal flooding occurs when seawater temporarily or permanently inundates an area due to a combination of sea level rise, high tides, wind, low atmospheric pressure and/or waves. This definition does not include coastal erosion. In a high emissions scenario, these data assume a sea level rise of 1.5 m by 2100.
  • extreme wind are strong wind conditions that can exceed a building’s design specifications (due to expected changes in sea surface temperature, wind regimes and speeds).
  • Bush fires are destructive fires that spread through trees and forest. This definition does not include grass fires.
  • Surface water flooding (sometimes called storm floods or flash floods) are surface floods. This occurs when sustained rains or heavy rainfall of short duration cause the soil to reach saturation point and drainage systems to overflow, causing excess water to accumulate.

Important Notice

The information on this page is provided for informational purposes only. It represents the views of the Climate Council of Australia Ltd based on climate risk analysis undertaken by Climate Valuation and should not be considered to constitute professional advice. Because it is intended only as a general guide, it may contain generalizations. You should consider seeking independent legal, financial, tax or other advice to ascertain how the information on this page relates to your particular circumstances. Climate Council of Australia Ltd is not liable for any loss caused, whether due to negligence or otherwise arising out of the use of or reliance on information provided directly or indirectly, by the use of this page.

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Game Day Guide – Eels vs. Cowboys Round Eight https://galerie-lachenaud.com/game-day-guide-eels-vs-cowboys-round-eight/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 02:23:38 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/game-day-guide-eels-vs-cowboys-round-eight/ The Parramatta Eels host the North Queensland Cowboys in round eight at TIO Stadium, Darwin. Kick-off is at 7:05 p.m. ACST and 7:35 p.m. AEST on Saturday, April 30. Here’s what you need to know about game day. Important Event Information Tickets and gates You can purchase same-day general admission tickets at the Ah Mat […]]]>

The Parramatta Eels host the North Queensland Cowboys in round eight at TIO Stadium, Darwin.

Kick-off is at 7:05 p.m. ACST and 7:35 p.m. AEST on Saturday, April 30.

Here’s what you need to know about game day.

Important Event Information

Tickets and gates

You can purchase same-day general admission tickets at the Ah Mat & Bonson gates: $35 adult, $10 child, $80 family, and $25 for the concession.

Or buy in advance to save and skip the line: $30 adults, $10 children, $70 family, $20 concession. Visit www.ticketmaster.com.au

The Ah Mat and Bonson gates open at 4 p.m. The scoreboard gate on the opposite side of the pitch (near St Mary’s Football Club) opens at 5.30pm, but will be restricted to fans with pre-purchased tickets only.

Welcome ticket holders can enjoy express entry via a dedicated lane at the Bonson Gate.

Family, general admission and corporate tickets for the McMahons ‘Open Air’ facility can be pre-purchased here.

Children 5 and under are free when accompanied by a ticketed parent or guardian.

Match day schedule

4 p.m. Doors open Ah Mat & Bonson

4:15 p.m. Kick-off of the Men’s U/16 Eels Cup Grand Final

5 p.m. Kick-off of the women’s grand final of the Eels Cup U/16

5:30 p.m. Dashboard door opens

6 p.m. Mix 104.9 Best Seats in the House Promotion drawn*

6:25 p.m. Beginning of the warm-up

7:05 p.m. Parramatta Eels kick off against North Queensland Cowboys (7:35 p.m. AEST)

9 p.m. Full time

* Enter TIO Stadium before 6 p.m. to enter the draw to win the top 1049 Mix 1049 seats in the house. Entrance via Mix 1049 broadcast in the Grandstand Level 1 Lobby.

Getting to and from TIO Stadium

Free buses

Dedicated event buses will run to and from TIO Stadium from Darwin, Stuart Park, Casuarina, Palmerston and Humpty Doo via Coolalinga. You will need to show your Eels v Cowboys ticket to board the bus. Check the bus timetables here.

Car park

Public parking is available on Abala Road and in the Marrara Sports Complex. Please refer to the venue and parking plan here.

Designated accessible parking is located at the Bonson Gate car park.

food drink

Food stalls will operate near the scoreboard entry door, behind the family area, behind the grandstand and o

n Level 2 of the grandstand. The stalls offer a range of food and non-alcoholic beverages. Refer to the venue map for locations.

Licensed bars will operate from the Scoreboard section, behind and to the side of the grandstand, and on level 2 of the grandstand.

You are not permitted to bring beverages (other than sealed water bottles) onto the site. Consideration will be given to people with special dietary needs

Family zone and things for children

The family area is located on the grassy hill at the Bonson Gate end of the lot. The family zone is a dry zone.

Say hello to our roving entertainers as you enter the stadium, take a photo at the photo booth on Level 1 of the Grandstand Lobby and have your face painted in Cowboys or Eels colours.

Camping mats and chairs

You can bring camping chairs and mats to sit on. If you bring a camping chair, you will be asked to sit on the upper grassy hills.

Please refer to the Terms and Conditions of Entry for a full list of what you can and cannot bring to TIO Stadium.

ATM

ATMs are located behind the grandstand.

Smoking areas

Smoking (including the use of electronic cigarettes or similar devices) is prohibited in most areas of the Site. There are three designated smoking areas in the TIO Stadium. Refer to the site map for locations.

Event Champions

Event champions provide a friendly face if you need help during the event. They will operate the information desk and lost and found items can be brought to the Champions Hub, located in the lobby behind the grandstand.

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Here’s how to celebrate the 200th birthday of Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr. https://galerie-lachenaud.com/heres-how-to-celebrate-the-200th-birthday-of-frederick-law-olmsted-sr/ Tue, 26 Apr 2022 18:30:35 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/heres-how-to-celebrate-the-200th-birthday-of-frederick-law-olmsted-sr/ The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) today released the 20th entry in its What’s there series of digital landscape guides – and this is a very special edition worthy of a milestone Olmstedian anniversary. Departing from the city and region based format of the previous What’s there guides (last year DC Modernism was the first series […]]]>

The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) today released the 20th entry in its What’s there series of digital landscape guides – and this is a very special edition worthy of a milestone Olmstedian anniversary.

Departing from the city and region based format of the previous What’s there guides (last year DC Modernism was the first series guide to focus on a specific landscape style), this year’s themed entry to the series zigzags across North America from Milwaukee to Montreal, Boston to Baltimore, Seattle to Staten Island, and hundreds of points in between to celebrate the 200th anniversary of American landscape architect, journalist and conservationist Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr.

In total, more than 300 landscapes (parks and boardwalks, college campuses, cemeteries, gardens, housing estates, private estates, etc.) designed by Olmsted, Sr. and his successor companies are included, drawing inspiration from What’s there‘s comprehensive landscape database. Searchable by designation, landscape type and style or by geographic location via a map, each database entry includes a brief but comprehensive description, media gallery and other relevant details that help paint a complete picture of each respective site, whether explored in person or remotely.

The Olmsted business family tree (courtesy of the Cultural Landscape Foundation)

The guide also includes a richly illustrated introductory essay on “Olmsted Landscape Legacy” and nearly 100 biographical entries for members of the Olmsted family as well as collaborators, company employees and other practitioners. associated with Olmsted, including, of course, Calvert Vaux, the London-born architect and landscape designer who partnered with Olmsted, Sr. on many major park and park system projects in New York (Central Park, Prospect Park, Fort Greene Park and Morningside Park) and further afield, including Buffalo, Chicago and the Hudson Valley town of Newburgh. Other key (but lesser known) figures linked to Olmsted include Warren Manning, Arthur Shurcliff, William Lyman Phillips and Stella Obst.

Optimized for smartphone use, What’s there Olmsted also includes GPS-enabled What’s Near feature which locates sites within a certain distance and provides mileage/walking time from a user’s current location.

“Frederick Law Olmsted, Sr.’s impact on national identity and the profession of landscape architecture is invaluable,” said TCLF President and CEO Charles A. Birnbaum. “What’s there Olmsted provides easy access to a wide range of landscapes designed by Olmsted, Sr. and his successor companies and opportunities to learn about the people associated with them.

cherry blossoms on the UW campus in Seattle
The University of Washington campus designed by the Olmsted Brothers in Seattle. (Steve Ginn/Courtesy of the Cultural Landscape Foundation)

What’s there Olmsted was made possible by presenting sponsor the National Endowment for the Arts and educational partners Olmsted 200 and the American Society of Landscape Architects. A 344-page printed guide to 200 Olmsted sites, Discover Olmsted – The Enduring Legacy of North American Landscapes by Frederick Law Olmsted, will be published this fall by Timber Press. Birnbaum co-authored the guide alongside Arleyn A. Levee and Dena Tasse-Winter.

Today’s release of What’s there Olmsted is just one of many tours, talks, parties, launches, conferences and affiliate events related to Olmsted 200, which is run by the Olmsted National Parks Association, based in Washington, DC. Although today is the big day, Olmsted 200 celebrations take place throughout the year—click here to find an event near you. A will also cover the centenary in the coming weeks and months with further stories about Olmsted’s formidable legacy, including a look at landscapes under threat later this year.

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How to Climate-Proof Your Garden https://galerie-lachenaud.com/how-to-climate-proof-your-garden/ Mon, 25 Apr 2022 08:02:09 +0000 https://galerie-lachenaud.com/how-to-climate-proof-your-garden/ Take a guided tour around the Cornell Botanic Gardens and you’ll eventually come across six unsuspecting raised beds filled with an array of flowers, fruits, and vegetables. Around the beds, posted signs provide information about climate change and the impacts that increased heat, drought, and flooding will have on common garden plants. But, as the […]]]>

Take a guided tour around the Cornell Botanic Gardens and you’ll eventually come across six unsuspecting raised beds filled with an array of flowers, fruits, and vegetables. Around the beds, posted signs provide information about climate change and the impacts that increased heat, drought, and flooding will have on common garden plants.

But, as the saying goes, seeing is believing, which is why, after a few minutes, the tour guide will lead you into a nearby plastic tunnel (pictured, below) where six identical raised beds are set up. That’s when reality begins to sink in. “You go into this high tunnel and it is noticeably warmer—uncomfortably so sometimes,” says Sonja Skelly, director of education for the gardens.

In a way, the simulated Cornell tunnel doubles as a time machine, fast-forwarding your tour group to the year 2050. That’s when scientists predict New York State will be around 4 to 6 degrees warmer. Though that might not seem like much on paper, in reality, “People can’t get out of there fast enough,” especially during the humid summers, explains Skelly. “As soon as you walk in the door, [the heat] hits you in the face.”

However, it’s at this point that (at least, if Skelly is leading a tour) the guide will remind you that this discomfort is fleeting; in just a few short minutes, you’ll be able to step back outside into the much milder temperatures of 2022. The plants before you, however, don’t enjoy the same luxury. Many are showing clear signs of heat stress, unlike their counterparts outside. One year, broccoli planted inside the tunnel grew to be lumpy and misshapen because of the higher temperatures.

Cornell’s created the Climate Change Demonstration Garden in 2014 “to use plants as the lens to help tell the story of climate change,” Skelly explains. It also doubled a way to show the public that climate change wasn’t just some obscure phenomenon happening elsewhere in the world—it will happen here, as well.

In fact, it’s already happening, and we won’t have to wait until 2050 to see the effects. Climate change “has had a huge impact on gardening,” said Missy Gable, director of the University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources (UC ANR). “My own personal experience with gardening and climate change has seriously revolved around drought.”

Meanwhile, to the East, the problem is—ironically enough—too much water. Annual precipitation has been increasing in many places across the country, leading to a higher risk of flooding in the spring. A shifting climate can also alter the distribution of both pollinators and pests in ways that are rarely in our favor, explains Nicole Rafferty, a professor of entomology at the University of California, Riverside. “Because climate dictates so much about where their suitable habitat is, once you change the climate you change where that habitat is found.”

Nevertheless, climate change doesn’t have to be the antagonist to a lush, beautiful garden. No matter where you are in the US, there are a few steps you can take to protect, adapt, and maintain your personal backyard paradise.

“If we don’t focus on creating gardens and landscapes that are resilient in the face of climate change, we’re just going to lose our plants,” warns Gable. Bottom line: We’ll also be losing the environmental and health benefits plants provide.

1. Get a handle on your region’s unique climate.

When it comes to climate, most gardeners are intimately familiar with the USDA plant hardiness zone map, which divides the country into 13 zones depending on a location’s average minimum temperature. Although it’s not perfect, it can still help you figure out which plants are most likely to survive the winter conditions in your region.

However, as temperatures rise, Heather Reynolds, a professor of biology at Indiana University, also recommends that gardeners reference the American Horticultural Society’s heat zones map, which shows how often an area might expect to see days above 86o F. (This is when plants often begin to show signs of heat stress.) Out West, Gable also refers local gardeners to the Sunset Climate Zones system. Unlike the other two zone maps, this one takes into account precipitation, wind, humidity, and the length of the growing season, creating a more precise picture of what your plants might have to deal with.

Remember, though, that these resources don’t account for how your local climate may change in the future. For that, Reynolds recommends looking up climate projections for your area. Try browsing the National Climate Assessment, or state-specific ones like California’s or Indiana’s.

“You need to think about how those changes are going to impact when you start growing things, [and] what species might be most appropriate to grow,” adds Reynolds.

2. Take control of your space.

Of course, this would all be easier if we could just control the weather. Sadly, gardeners don’t have that power… or do they? “We can control microclimates somewhat by where we place plants,” says Karrie Reid, an environmental horticulture advisor at the UC Cooperative Extension of San Joaquin County.

This is precisely why she and Gable recommend that all gardeners think carefully about how they set up their landscape. For example, are there areas in your garden that receive more shade than others? Some plants may be better there.

Shade will be an especially valuable resource during the hotter summers, which is why you should start paying special attention to any trees that dot your garden—and try to keep them alive at all costs. If you don’t have trees, “the first thing that you can do, even in the face of climate change, is to start getting some trees established and place them appropriately so that they can mature and shade your home,” says Gable. (Check out Sierra‘s simple guide to tree planting.)

“The first thing that you can do, even in the face of climate change, is to start getting some trees established and place them appropriately so that they can mature and shade your home.”

In addition to trees, “I really encourage people to have large ornamental grasses around their yard,” said Reid. Their tightly packed leaves can provide beneficial insect shelter from high wind and cold temperatures.

Even better: Opt for native plants or those that can thrive under similar environmental conditions. They will not only benefit pollinators but often require less resources, like fertilizer, in the long run.

That said, if you’re still waiting for those pollinator-friendly plants to get established, you can always build or purchase some nesting boxes and place them around your home. You can also leave out nesting material, like reeds, and let the critters do the work themselves, said Rafferty, the entomology professor. Another option is to simply leave patches of the ground free of mulch, plants, or pavement. That’s where a lot of native bees like to hang out.

3. Don’t dismiss the dirt.

Just as important as the plants you grow? The dirt you plant them in. The quality of your soil can end up determining “how healthy the plants are going to be and also how resilient they’re going to be to climate changes,” explains Reynolds.

Create a healthier soil by incorporating compost or mulch—anything that can help build up organic matter. “The more organic matter you have, the better your soil is able to drain after a heavy rainfall event, and also hold more water during a short-term drought,” said David Wolfe, a professor of horticulture at Cornell University.

Along the same lines, another thing to consider is your soil type. This is especially important in drought-prone regions where “having the right irrigation system that’s matched to your soil is critical,” says Reid. She advises that those with heavier soils should irrigate slowly, so that the water can penetrate down to the roots. In contrast, for sandy soils, “you’re going to apply water more frequently” but in much smaller amounts.

Don’t know what soil type you have? Contact your local Cooperative Extension Office. According to Reid, “They have really good resources and people to help you figure out how to take a soil sample.”

4. Eradicate pests naturally.

Weeds, pests, and disease have always been the stuff of every gardener’s nightmare. Unfortunately, this is just going to get worse with climate change.

But think twice before reaching for pesticides or herbicides, as these noxious formulas don’t discriminate against pollinators. They also set up a cycle of dependency, says Reid, by “creating plants that aren’t really sturdy or adapted to the environment that they’re in.”

Instead, grow a variety of plants. “The more diversity that you have, the more eggs you have in your basket to deal with different threats that might emerge,” says Reynolds. A diverse, healthy garden also increases the likelihood of attracting the pests’ natural predators, which can ultimately help control their populations.

But, if all else fails, Reid once again recommends contacting your local Cooperative Extension Office. They can help you troubleshoot disease or pest issues without the use of pesticides. They also often keep track of outbreaks happening in local areas, says Wolfe.

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To Gable and many others, gardening is more than a hobby. “Gardening can be moderate exercise activity,” she says. “And then on the mental side, it activates your senses with sights, and smells, and sounds and textures.”

But gardens of all sizes help more than just the individual. They filter the air, protect the soil, and even sequester carbon dioxide. Making them climate-resilient only prolongs these numerous benefits.

And yes, even those of us with tiny rooftop garden are making a difference.

“It’s important to think about it in terms of ‘cumulative,’ reminds Reynolds. “It can have profound scaling-up effects when enough people are doing it that you actually then create a cumulative footprint of greenspace.”

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